[Kleine-Levin syndrome. The provocation of manic symptoms by an antidepressant and a therapeutic trial of carbamazepine].

Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 1989 Oct 6;114(40):1528-31.
[Article in German]

Source

Neurologische Klinik, Universität Düsseldorf.

Abstract

A 17-year-old adolescent had a recurrent episode of somnolence and morbid hunger (Kleine-Levin syndrome) three years after a first attack, from which he had spontaneously recovered. He was treated with 50 mg daily of clomipramine for the somnolence accompanied by disturbance of attention and memory. Under this treatment he developed thymoleptic symptoms with polyphagia, logorrhea and hyperactivity. Placed on a trial dose of at first 600 mg, then 400 mg carbamazepine daily the abnormal findings disappeared within a few days, and there has been no recurrence after some months. It is postulated, based on the observations of this case, that the Kleine-Levin syndrome, presumably a functional hypothalamic disorder, is closely related to the endogenous psychoses.

PMID:
2791906
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Uploaded by on Jul 14, 2011

British teenager suffers from a rare syndrome that causes her to sleep for days. A bout of influenza brought on the manic episodes.

Lithium Carbonate is being used to treat the condition.  The medication Lithium is know to induced Creutzfeldt-Jakob syndrome, another encephalopic condition that is fatal.

Visual Hallucinations in Mania

Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine
Visual Hallucinations in Mania
Arindam Chakrabartyand  M. S. Reddy
Asha Bipolar Clinic (ABC), Asha Hospital, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India
Address for correspondence: Dr. Arindam Chakrabarty, # 298, Road No: 14, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad – 500 034, Andhra Pradesh, India. E-mail: dr.arindamch@gmail.com
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract

Visual hallucinations occur in a wide variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including toxic disturbances, drug withdrawal syndromes, focal central nervous system lesions, migraine headaches, blindness, schizophrenia, and psychotic mood disorders. Visual hallucinations are generally assumed to characteristically reflect organic disorders and are very rare in affective disorders. Here, we present a case of visual hallucinations in a young female with bipolar illness during the manic phase.
Keywords: Mania, visual hallucinations, bipolar
Visual hallucinations occur in a wide variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including toxic disturbances, drug withdrawal syndromes, focal central nervous system lesions, migraine headaches, blindness, schizophrenia, and psychotic mood disorders. Although, visual hallucinations are generally assumed to characteristically reflect organic disorders, they are seen in one-fourth to one-half of schizophrenic patients, often, but not always in conjunction with auditory hallucinations. Visual hallucinations range from simple and elemental, in which hallucinations consist of flashes of light or geometrical Figures to elaborate visions such as a flock of angels.
It is often difficult to decide whether the full criteria for the presence of hallucinations have been fulfilled in the visual modality (Sims). Some of the earlier writers used the term “hallucination” for other visual abnormalities that occurred and the prevalence of visual hallucinations reported in psychiatric illnesses was much higher than reported in studies which used a more stringent definition of hallucination. The current understanding is that visual hallucinations are very uncommon in pure psychiatric illness (Persaud and Cutting). Visual hallucinations are not reckoned to occur in affective psychoses uncomplicated by organic factors (Sims).
Here, we describe a case of a female who developed visual hallucinations during an episode of uncomplicated mania.

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