Cases of Fluoxetine-induced mania

J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2011 Summer;23(3):E23-4.

Hypomania as a genuine side effect of fluoxetine.

PMID:
21948913
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
No abstract available.
 
Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2004 Aug;58(4):448-9.

Fluoxetine-induced mania in an Asian patient.

PMID:
15298662
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
 
No abstract available.
 
Depress Anxiety. 2002;15(1):46-7.

Mania associated with mirtazapine augmentation of fluoxetine.

Source

Sun Valley Behavioral Medical Center, El Centro, California 92243, USA. bernardo_ng@hotmail.com

PMID:
11816053
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
No abstract available.
 
 
 
Advertisements

Antidepressant-associated mania: soon after switch from fluoxetine to mirtazapine in an elderly woman with mixed depressive features.

J Psychopharmacol. 2009 Mar;23(2):220-2. Epub  2008 May 30.

Source

Department of Psychiatry, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. chchliu@ntu.edu.tw

Abstract

Mirtazapine augmentation to a serotonin-reuptake inhibitor has been proposed to boost antidepressant effects and more likely to induce manic switch. Such a combined antidepressant therapy strategy should be used carefully if the patient’s refractoriness is attributable to mixed depressive features.

Mixed depression is more difficult to be treated by antidepressant monotherapy and related to higher risk of manic switch during treatment.

We report a case with no previous history of bipolar disorder, whereas developed full-blown psychotic manic symptoms soon after switch from fluoxetine to mirtazapine.

The patient’s premorbid characters and clinical presentations suggested an implicit bipolarity that predisposed her to a manic switch. Her manic switch was likely to be triggered by a simulated combined effect because of complex drug interactions during shifting from fluoxetine to mirtazapine.

For patients in mixed depressive states, mood stabilizers are preferable to antidepressants.

PMID:
18515466
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Up ↑