Khat and mushrooms associated with psychosis.

World J Biol Psychiatry. 2004 Jan;5(1):49-53.

Khat and mushrooms associated with psychosis.

Source

Vincent van Gogh Institute for Psychiatry, Venray, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This paper describes two cases with khat- and two with psilocybin-induced psychoses and draws attention to the medical and social consequences of the use of these drugs.

METHOD:

Two male patients are presented who developed relapsing and short-lasting psychotic episodes after chewing kath leaves. In addition, two male patients are reported who showed an acute exacerbation of psychosis after ingestion of psilocybin mushrooms. In addition, a review of the literature is presented.

RESULTS:

The khat-induced psychotic symptoms disappeared without any treatment within one week. One of the patients with a psilocybin-induced psychosis was treated with risperidone. In the other, symptomatology subsided in a few days. No somatic medical complications occurred.

CONCLUSION:

Adequate psychiatric diagnosis and treatment of the psychoses and the negative social consequences of the use of these drugs are stressed as well as the delineation from functional psychoses in cases of chronic use. The latter applies to patients with psychiatric comorbidity in particular.

PMID:
15048636
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
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Prolonged psychosis after Amanita muscaria ingestion.

Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2006 May;118(9-10):294-7.

Source

Poison Control Center, University Medical Center Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. miran.brvar@kclj.si

Abstract

Amanita muscaria has a bright red or orange cap covered with small white plaques. It contains the isoxazole derivatives ibotenic acid, muscimol and muscazone and other toxins such as muscarine. The duration of clinical manifestations after A. muscaria ingestion does not usually exceed 24 hours; we report on a 5-day paranoid psychosis after A. muscaria ingestion. A 48-year-old man, with no previous medical history, gathered and ate mushrooms he presumed to be A. caesarea. Half an hour later he started to vomit and fell asleep. He was found comatose having a seizure-like episode. On admission four hours after ingestion he was comatose, but the remaining physical and neurological examinations were unremarkable. Creatine kinase was 8.33 microkat/l. Other laboratory results and brain CT scan were normal. Toxicology analysis did not find any drugs in his blood or urine. The mycologist identified A. muscaria among the remaining mushrooms. The patient was given activated charcoal. Ten hours after ingestion, he awoke and was completely orientated; 18 hours after ingestion his condition deteriorated again and he became confused and uncooperative. Afterwards paranoid psychosis with visual and auditory hallucinations appeared and persisted for five days. On the sixth day all symptoms of psychosis gradually disappeared. One year later he is not undergoing any therapy and has no symptoms of psychiatric disease. We conclude that paranoid psychosis with visual and auditory hallucinations can appear 18 hours after ingestion of A. muscaria and can last for up to five days.

PMID:
16810488
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Khat and mushrooms associated with psychosis.

World J Biol Psychiatry. 2004 Jan;5(1):49-53.

Source

Vincent van Gogh Institute for Psychiatry, Venray, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This paper describes two cases with khat- and two with psilocybin-induced psychoses and draws attention to the medical and social consequences of the use of these drugs.

METHOD:

Two male patients are presented who developed relapsing and short-lasting psychotic episodes after chewing kath leaves. In addition, two male patients are reported who showed an acute exacerbation of psychosis after ingestion of psilocybin mushrooms. In addition, a review of the literature is presented.

RESULTS:

The khat-induced psychotic symptoms disappeared without any treatment within one week. One of the patients with a psilocybin-induced psychosis was treated with risperidone. In the other, symptomatology subsided in a few days. No somatic medical complications occurred.

CONCLUSION:

Adequate psychiatric diagnosis and treatment of the psychoses and the negative social consequences of the use of these drugs are stressed as well as the delineation from functional psychoses in cases of chronic use. The latter applies to patients with psychiatric comorbidity in particular.

PMID:
15048636
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Prolonged psychosis after Amanita muscaria ingestion.

Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2006 May;118(9-10):294-7.

Source

Poison Control Center, University Medical Center Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. miran.brvar@kclj.si

Abstract

Amanita muscaria has a bright red or orange cap covered with small white plaques. It contains the isoxazole derivatives ibotenic acid, muscimol and muscazone and other toxins such as muscarine. The duration of clinical manifestations after A. muscaria ingestion does not usually exceed 24 hours; we report on a 5-day paranoid psychosis after A. muscaria ingestion. A 48-year-old man, with no previous medical history, gathered and ate mushrooms he presumed to be A. caesarea. Half an hour later he started to vomit and fell asleep. He was found comatose having a seizure-like episode. On admission four hours after ingestion he was comatose, but the remaining physical and neurological examinations were unremarkable. Creatine kinase was 8.33 microkat/l. Other laboratory results and brain CT scan were normal. Toxicology analysis did not find any drugs in his blood or urine. The mycologist identified A. muscaria among the remaining mushrooms. The patient was given activated charcoal. Ten hours after ingestion, he awoke and was completely orientated; 18 hours after ingestion his condition deteriorated again and he became confused and uncooperative. Afterwards paranoid psychosis with visual and auditory hallucinations appeared and persisted for five days. On the sixth day all symptoms of psychosis gradually disappeared. One year later he is not undergoing any therapy and has no symptoms of psychiatric disease. We conclude that paranoid psychosis with visual and auditory hallucinations can appear 18 hours after ingestion of A. muscaria and can last for up to five days.

PMID:
16810488
[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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