Considerations on Advocating Forced Treatment

By Maria Mangicaro
As a volunteer for nonprofit organizations like  the International Society for Ethical Psychology and Psychiatry (ISEPP) and AMVETS Ladies Auxiliary, it is my way of giving back as I feel I have been very blessed.
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Membership in ISEPP is attractive to many as it welcomes both professionals and non-professionals alike.
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From my own experiences, it was very difficult to find providers who offered alternatives to main stream psychiatry and it was even more difficult to find a psychiatrist who would work with me if I used complimentary treatments to try and taper off of psych meds.
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Medical professionals risk their reputation and their credentials by offering evidence-based alternatives like Integrative Psychiatry/Functional Medicine.
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Volunteering for ISEPP gives me an opportunity to help provide support to mental health professionals who are open-minded enough to explore, expand and create awareness of evidence-based alternatives.
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Unlike any other health condition, mental/behavioral/emotional health conditions overlap into our criminal justice system, leaving those in need of help incarcerated and at the mercy of limited services and treatment options.
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Historically, mental health laws are unique because they have been designed to employ and empower medical opinion who select specific treatment options. Coercive mental health treatment contributed to the proliferation of the psychopharmacological revolution.
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Sanctioned by the Supreme Court in Buck v. Bell(1927), many individuals labeled with a mental disorder become part of a class of people who can be deprived equal protection, civil liberties and the liberty to contract. They are in need of a strong, ethical and united advocacy agenda that promotes best-practice standards of treatment and care.
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Uploaded by on Jan  6, 2008

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Individuals in the mental health system can be forced to contract the services of specific providers and forced to become consumers of potentially lethal products.
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Because individuals labeled with mental disorders can be perceived as a threat to themselves or others, psychiatry and the use of medication management as the primary choice of “treatment” has become an unregulated power-base of authority in the U.S.
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The topic of “mental illness” involves a broad-spectrum of concerns. My main advocacy agenda involves symptoms of psyhosis and mania.
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Advocates who support forced “treatment” of psychotic symptoms should consider the possibility the treatment they are advocating for could kill a person they claim to be advocating on behalf of, or cause that person to kill/harm others.
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Likewise, advocates who oppose forced treatment of psychotic symptoms should consider the accurate diagnosis and treatment of the symptoms could save the lives.
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As a mental health advocate, my agenda is very specific and based on the fact many medical conditions and substance-induced conditions can manifest as symptoms of psychosis/mania and be misdiagnosed as schizophrenia/bipolar disorder.
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My goal as an advocate is to raise the bar on forced “treatment” to include accurate assessment, informed consent and treatment options that include the right treatment.
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In 1996 I suffered an acute manic episode from toxic encephalopathy. I was misdiagnosed as having bipolar disorder with psychotic features at the same hospital that according to the published study pasted below, misdiagnosed a 15-year-old girl suffering from lupus. After treatment with steroids, she no longer required psych meds.
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In my opinion, trying to prevent prolonged suffering from being misdiagnosed is well worth putting time, effort and energy into.
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Kind Regards, Maria Mangicaro
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Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as bipolar I disorder with catatonic features.
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Psychosomatics. 2009 Sep-Oct;50(5):543-7.
Alao AO, Chlebowski S, Chung C.
Source
Department of Psychiatry, SUNY Upstate, NY 13210, USA. alaoa@upstate.edu
Abstract
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BACKGROUND:
The American College of Rheumatology has defined 19 neuropsychiatric syndromes associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) involving the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of lupus (NPSLE) have been shown to occur in up to 95% of pediatric patients with SLE.
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OBJECTIVE:
The authors describe a 15-year-old African American young woman with a family history positive for bipolar I disorder and schizophrenia, who presented with symptoms consistent with an affective disorder.
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METHOD:
The patient was diagnosed with Bipolar I disorder with catatonic features and required multiple hospitalizations for mood disturbance. Two years after her initial presentation, the patient was noted to have a malar rash and subsequently underwent a full rheumatologic work-up, which revealed cerebral vasculitis.
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RESULTS:
NPSLE was diagnosed and, after treatment with steroids, the patient improved substantially and no longer required further psychiatric medication or therapy.
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CONCLUSION:
Given the especially high prevalence of NPSLE in pediatric patients with lupus, it is important for clinicians to recognize that neuropsychiatric symptoms in an adolescent patient may indeed be the initial manifestations of SLE, as opposed to a primary affective disorder.


Published on Mar 13, 2012 by SignsofThyComing

Right in your Face. Welcome to the Fourth Reich

Uploaded by Amen Ptah on Apr 4, 2011

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